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The very first *unofficial* release from the Strange Edge emerged in December of 2014. We didn’t consider this a major event, simply a way to gather together a bunch of G. Arthur Brown’s short short fiction and sell it relatively cheaply because spare change in the pocket helps pay parking meter fees. However, through some fluke of fate, this little devil managed to sneak onto the final ballot of the Wonderland Awards, the greatest (and currently only) honor in the genre of Bizarro fiction. It’s astounding and we are truly pleased to be sharing the ballot with such other deserving candidates as Violet LeVoit, Danger Slater, CV Hunt, and Kevin Strange, not to mention all the nominees for Best Novel.

To celebrate, I LIKE TURTLES is 99 cents for a limited time!

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The Four Gentlemen of the Apocalypse by Douglas Hackle, Dustin Reade, G. Arthur Brown, and S.T. Cartlege.

The Strange Edge’s first official release features four absurreal novelettes from Douglas Hackle, Dustin Reade, G. Arthur Brown, and S.T. Cartledge.

The Ballad of TERROR TINY TIM (Hackle): In an absurd world where the letter “r” has yet to be discovered, something evil is said to lurk behind a locked door in a suburban sex dungeon where a kidnapped father and an incestuous bigamist named You-Don’t-Have-To-Be-Lonely-At-Farmers-Only-Dot-Com find themselves imprisoned for life.

The Canal (Reade): As lawyers quote Melville and insects use public transit, one man has the audacity to become an adorable little kitty cat.

I Took One Apple to the Grave (Brown): In the time of the board game Risk, a sergeant attends to an elderly, dying man as fairy tale events transpire, sometimes to contradictory effect, while they wait for The Wolves to arrive and fulfill the often repeated and even more often revised Prophecy.

Wizard and Robot in the Land of Sand and Bones (Cartledge): A robot and a wizard made of glass wander a dreamscape of shifting sand dunes, searching through the ruins for signs of life, but what they find is far wilder than they could have expected.

Praise for The Four Gentlemen of the Apocalypse.

“In the tradition of Three Cases of Murder, this four sided apocalypse hymn will set your nerves to dizzy. The Strange Edge has brewed up something wicked, tasty. Drink it up and feel that darkness.” — Brian Allen Carr, author of Motherfucking Sharks and The Last Horror Novel in the History of the World

“I am emerging from a night infused with confusion and discomfort. I sat myself down, did my best to tend to ongoing hydration issues, and began reading the words of these four apocalyptic gentlemen. A brief sojourn with unusual words became more, tempting me toward the sort of all-nighter I haven’t pulled since my brief obsession with the American Ninja movies in the 90s. And here I am… evolved in some way. Douglas Hackle, Dustin Read, G. Arthur Brown and S.T. Cartledge. Four names, each rather unexceptional in a purely linguistic context, but behind these names reside people, and within these people reside ideas. It’s these ideas… these sickening, hilarious, thought-provoking, worryingly arousing ideas you must be careful of. Sure… reading these ideas can be achieved in one frantic night, but they linger beyond the act of reading them. They insinuate themselves and become a component of who you are. These four gentlemen of the apocalypse know what they’re doing, and I struggle to think of any who can do it better. This blurb is long, but how could it be anything else? How else can I both tempt you toward and warn you away? Read this collection. I have faith your mind can take it, but if instead these words take your mind, please don’t say I didn’t warn you. For those dissuaded by grandiloquent musings within blurbage, there is also a character called Wasilly.” — Matthew Revert, author of Basal Ganglia and Human Trees (less)

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In just a few days the first official Strange Edge Publications e-book makes it debut. It’s an anthology featuring four novelettes by the authors Douglas Hackle (Wonderland Book Award-nominated author of Clown Tear Junkies), Dustin Reade (author of Grambo and We’re Decomposing as We Go…), G. Arthur Brown (the smug, crass bastard who publishes his own work in anthologies that his own press releases and author of Kitten and I Like Turtles), and S.T. Cartlege (author of House Hunter and Day of the Milkman).

Brian Allen Carr, Wonderland Book Award-winning author of Motherfucking Sharks and The Last Horror Novel in the History of the World, carefully crafted these 35 words on the topic:

In the tradition of Three Cases of Murder, this four sided apocalypse hymn will set your nerves to dizzy. The Strange Edge has brewed up something wicked, tasty. Drink it up and feel that darkness.

Matthew Revert, author of Basal Ganglia and Human Trees, had this to say:

I am emerging from a night infused with confusion and discomfort. I sat myself down, did my best to tend to ongoing hydration issues, and began reading the words of these four apocalyptic gentlemen. A brief sojourn with unusual words became more, tempting me toward the sort of all-nighter I haven’t pulled since my brief obsession with the American Ninja movies in the 90s. And here I am… evolved in some way. Douglas Hackle, Dustin Read, G. Arthur Brown and S.T. Cartledge. Four names, each rather unexceptional in a purely linguistic context, but behind these names reside people, and within these people reside ideas. It’s these ideas… these sickening, hilarious, thought-provoking, worryingly arousing ideas you must be careful of. Sure… reading these ideas can be achieved in one frantic night, but they linger beyond the act of reading them. They insinuate themselves and become a component of who you are. These four gentlemen of the apocalypse know what they’re doing, and I struggle to think of any who can do it better. This blurb is long, but how could it be anything else? How else can I both tempt you toward and warn you away? Read this collection. I have faith your mind can take it, but if instead these words take your mind, please don’t say I didn’t warn you. For those dissuaded by grandiloquent musings within blurbage, there is also a character called Wasilly.

Being praised by BAC and Revert is what The Strange Edge is all about. But it does not end there.

Danger Slater, author of DangerRAMA, said this:

If the God of Absurdity were the One True God, then this book would be his Bible.

Four novellas. Four writers. One cover. Lots of fun.

This was four strong novellas by four strong authors with four distinct voices who give four definitions to the word ‘absurd’. If you’re a fan (or just curious) about even one of these authors it’s worth the ticket price alone. You’ll be pleasantly surprised. Or maybe you won’t be surprised, since I just told you you were going to be surprised. It’s difficult to be surprised if you’re expecting it. Let me fix that: “…it’s worth the ticket price alone. You’ll be pleasantly ENTERTAINED.” There, that’s better.

And Jason Wayne Allen, author of The Rotgut County Blues, had this to say:

The Four Gentlemen of the Apocalypse is modern absurd surrealism at its finest. The book is a collection of novelettes by some of the greatest writers in the realm of just, simply put, balls-out weirdo-insane fiction... a must-read for anyone into offbeat, hilarious or heartwarming stories. Plenty entertaining, and plenty weird…

This much praised anthology will appear on Amazon circa 14th of July. BEWARE.

Peter Sellers

Hello! I’m the Late Peter Sellers, and though I may be dead that doesn’t stop me from exerting my imperious will on the mortal plane. When I learned that G. Arthur Brown had opened up The Strange Edge to novelette submissions, I became excited and slightly aroused. I’d been huffing the ghost of paint thinner for several hours beforehand, so it shocked to me realize that the material plane was still even real, let alone inhabited by a small press searching out absurreal manuscripts in the 7 to 15 thousand word range. Who does that? Apparently The Strange Edge does that. I told Brown his business model was stupid but perhaps stupid enough to work.

I also told him I would help him by inspiring young and obscure authors with my masculine wiles. So, I’m issuing bounties for manuscripts that meet particular, bizarre criteria of my own device. He told me this was a stupid idea but perhaps just stupid enough to work.

What, you may ask is, do I mean by a bounty? A bounty is an award paid for having a manuscript accepted that meets with my lunatic specifications. The bounty in this case is $20 American, which can buy you six Chik-fil-A sandwiches in most markets. The bounty is paid in addition to the normal 20% royalty associated with having a novelette accepted for inclusion in an anthology. (And, lest there be any confusion, a bounty is only paid out if the manuscript is actually accepted for publication.)

How does one claim a bounty? Well, one would read the below list of prompts, pick one which appeals to one, email us at strangeedgemagazine@gmail.com with the header BOUNTY CLAIM, specifying which bounty one intends to claim and giving a short description of the story you intend to write. The DEADLINE for you to submit your 7 to 15 thousand word manuscript is June 30th. Keep in mind that neither G. Arthur Brown nor I are looking for these prompts to be answered too literally. For instance, if you wish to claim the non-existent bounty of “Star Wars directed by Alfred Hitchcock” and simply parodied the script of Rear Window with Han Solo as Jimmy Stewart and Vader as the murderous neighbor, that would be too literal and not inventive, let alone weird, enough. What we want is something with the epic scope of Star Wars and the stylistic nuances of Hitchcock… but we don’t even want that because it is simply an example bounty, so don’t send us “Star Wars as directed by Hitchcock.” (Though, Rear Window with Han Solo might be worth a read, now that I’m thinking of it.)

Without further ado, here they are:

The Bounties
1. An episode of The Twilight Zone written by Kafka and directed by Terry Gilliam.
2. A psychological thriller that mixes A Clockwork Orange and Barbarella with Camus and Beckett.
3. David Lynch’s Godzilla starring Monty Python.
4. A 70s b-movie adaptation of Thomas Ligotti directed by the love child of Alejandro Jodorowsky and John Waters.
5. A Donald Barthelme novel adapted as a silent Guy Maddin short with a dash of H. R. Giger’s art direction.
6. A post-apocalyptic rendition of The Wicker Man as a Rankin/Bass production.
7. A sequel to Bill & Ted written by Charlie Kaufman and directed by Nishimura/Iguchi.
8. A hauntingly surreal existential horror story with elements of Zardoz, Strawberry Shortcake, and The Tempest.
9. An absurd black comedy in a world of Dali-esque landscapes starring a completely unlikeable protagonist a la Perfume or The Wasp Factory.
10. Ionesco’s adaptation of Philip K. Dick’s classic Ren & Stimpy set in ancient Mesopotamia detailing hijinks during the war with the extraterrestrial Skraelings of Atlantis.

Some of these are probably more easily imagined than others but these would all make novelettes I’d love to read. And allow me to reiterate DO NOT BE TOO LITERAL. I don’t want to see Bill or Godzilla or The Purple Pieman in the final product. These are jumping off points that give you a clue to directions I want to see explored.

So, if any of these piques your interest, email strangeedgemagazine@gmail.com with the header BOUNTY CLAIM, specifying the bounty you intend to claim and including a short description of the story you intend to write. And make sure you can have your 7 to 15k word novelette completed and emailed to us by June 30th. If I’m repeating myself it’s only that I want to hammer in the important details. Paris is the capital of France.

Paris, once again, is the capital of France.

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Due to my own lack of not knowing what I don’t know about producing a magazine, the debut 0th issue of the Strange Edge Magazine will not be available until sometime in the 1st quarter of 2015. I promise a quality product when I finally get it done, featuring fiction, poetry, photography, advice, reviews, and an interview of Christ Kelso conducted by The Late Peter Sellers. That’s right. I found Sellers’ corpse and had him raised from the grave at minimal cost, but he’s somewhat diminished compared to his living self and is only suited to interviews these days.

Fear not, it’s on the way.

—G. Arthur Brown, Chief Editor

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Submissions have just closed here at The Strange Edge Magazine so that means the debut issue, Issue 0, is starting to come together. We’ve already accepted quite a few high quality works, and the last few stragglers are sitting in my inbox waiting to be evaluated. Some early acceptances include a short absurdist play by D. Harlan Wilson (author of the Wonderland Award winning Dr. Identity), a hilariously mindbending short from Douglas Hackle (author of the Wonderland nominee Clown Tear Junkies), two flash pieces from Ray Fracalossy (author of Tales from the Vinegar Wasteland), a video game review by Bradley Sands (author of Rico Slade Will Fucking Kill You), an abstract prose-poem from R. A. Harris (author of All Art is Junk), another short play by the theatrical Michael Allen Rose (author of Party Wolves in My Skull), and a Lynchian story from teen heart-throb Sean Leonard (whose brilliant detective story “To Hell with the Metal” can be found in Axes of Evil). The official TOC will be revealed in October, so hold on to your hats.

The full-color, full-sized cover (b&w snippet above) was designed by Matthew Revert (designer of many fine book covers and author of the Wonderland nominee Basal Ganglia), incorporating the photography of the visually astounding Tracy Terrill.

You can expect the ebook-only Issue 0 release in early November. It’ll be super cheap to buy. You’ll never get so much goodness in one package for such a low price again in your life, unless you start robbing bookstores.  Issue 0 will serve as the flagship for what The Strange Edge Magazine represents, its mission statement, its promise to consumers. The plan is to create a semiannual print and ebook journal of weird lit that actually pays contributors as much as we can possibly afford to pay them. The Strange Edge aesthetic will be clearly laid out in Issue 0. That’s our guarantee.

Get excited… now.

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The Shape of Things to Come

Posted: June 19, 2014 in Uncategorized

This is the future home of The Strange Edge Magazine.

A magazine of truly weird fiction.